• Cerazette

Cerazette Contraceptive Pill

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    In Stock

  • Suitable for women who are breastfeeding
  • Progestogen only
  • Effective contraception

Cerazette Contraceptive Pill

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From £19.99

Medication features

Cerazette is a contraceptive pill used to prevent pregnancy that only contains progestogen. This type of pill is known as the “mini-pill” and is suitable for women who are breastfeeding and those who don’t tolerate oestrogen.

Please note: This page is only to be used as a reference of our price for this medication. If you are approved you will be offered treatment for you and the prescriber to jointly consider. However, the final decision will always be the prescriber's.
NOTE: After selecting this product, you will need to complete a short assessment, so we can make sure this medication is suitable for you.
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  • Overview

    What Is Cerazette and How Does It Work?

    Cerazette is an effective contraceptive pill that helps with the prevention of unplanned pregnancy. It is a progesterone-only pill that has the active ingredient desogestrel. This active ingredient is a synthetic version of the female sex hormone progesterone.

    Cerazette is an ideal form of contraception for women who cannot take oestrogen. If you are breastfeeding, a smoker, or overweight, then progesterone-only pills like Cerazette are safer to use. If used correctly, Cerazette is 99% effective at preventing pregnancy.

    Cerazette works in two different ways. Firstly, it thickens the fluid in the cervix; making it a lot more difficult for sperm to enter the womb and fertilise any eggs that are released.

    Secondly, it increases progesterone levels in such a way that prevents the release of an egg, stopping ovulation altogether.

    Does Cerazette Stop Periods?

    Most women who take Cerazette experience changes to their periods. Typically, any irregular bleeding will be resolved within the first few months. However, if this does persist and you are concerned, then it is advised that you book an appointment with your doctor. 

    The Cerazette pill can stop periods for many women, and some will not experience a period during the time they are taking Cerazette. However, this is not always the case for everyone.

    If you have any questions, make sure to speak to your pharmacist or doctor.

    Cerazette and Breastfeeding

    The Cerazette Pill is considered a safe and popular form of contraception for women who are breastfeeding. It is important to note that small amounts of the hormone in Cerazette may pass into the baby's bloodstream through breast milk. However, this is not considered harmful to your baby and does not affect the way your breast milk is produced.

    Cerazette Missed Pill

    The Cerazette pill should always be taken at the same time each day. If you are late taking it one day, you should take it as soon as possible. If you are less than 12 hours late taking a Cerazette pill, then you are still protected and don’t need to use extra contraception when engaging in sexual activity. 

    However, if you are more than 12 hours late, then there’s a good chance that you will not be protected against pregnancy. Over the course of the next two days, as you continue to take Cerazette as normal, avoid having sexual intercourse or make sure to use a condom. If you have had unprotected sex during this time, speak to your doctor or pharmacist about the morning after pill.

    For more information on the morning after pill, take a look at our in-depth morning after pill guide that discusses how effective the morning pill is.

    Cerelle vs Cerazette

    Cerelle is another form of the contraceptive pill. Both Cerazette and Cerelle are progesterone-only pills with the same active ingredient – desogestrel. 

    The main differences between these two contraceptive pills include different brand names and the cost of each. The Cerazette pill is generally more expensive than Cerelle.

    Norgeston vs Cerazette

    Like Cerelle and Cerazette, Norgeston is another effective progesterone-only pill. It is similar to the Cerazette pill as it should be taken at the same time every day. You should also continue to take Norgeston without a break. 

    The main difference between these two pills is their active ingredient. Cerazette is made using desogestrel, whilst Norgeston contains the hormone levonorgestrel. This hormone is used in several birth control methods.

    Desogestrel vs Cerazette

    Desogestrel is the active ingredient in Cerazette. Cerazette is a branded version of the progesterone-only pill. Desogestrel is the active ingredient in several birth control pills such as Cerelle and Cerazette. Ultimately, desogestrel works by stopping a woman's eggs from fully developing each month.

    Cerazette Reviews

    There are plenty of positive reviews regarding Cerazette online. Everyone's journey with contraception is unique to them, and some people react better to Cerazette than others.

    Generally, Cerazette is praised for being highly effective. It has helped many women overcome painful symptoms associated with conditions like endometriosis, as periods usually stop altogether. Most women also reported experiencing very few side effects.

    The general feedback regarding Cerazette is mostly positive. It is important to note that finding the right contraception can be a process. If you are on Cerazette and you feel like it is not the right form of contraception for you, then it is advised that you make an appointment with your doctor to discuss the matter further.

    Can You Buy Cerazette Over The Counter In The UK?

    You cannot buy Cerazette over the counter in the UK as it is a prescription-only medication. If you feel like Cerazette is the right form of contraception for you, then you will need to make an appointment with your doctor. They will assess whether Cerazette is safe for you to use.

    Cloud Pharmacy makes the process of buying Cerazette online simple. Following a short online consultation, one of our trained pharmacists will prescribe and dispatch your prescription which you will receive the very next day.

  • Directions

    How To Take Cerazette

    Firstly, you need to decide what time of the day you would like to take it. Once you have decided on your set time, you will then take one Cerazette pill each day at the same time.

    The Cerazette pill can be taken with or without food, depending on how you prefer to digest it. Some people struggle to swallow pills whole, so taking them with food can make it easier. Once you finish your first pack of Cerazette, continue with a new pack. You do not need to take a break, and you should take one pill every day, continuously.

    How Long Does Cerazette Take To Start Working?

    This is dependent on when you begin taking the Cerazette pill. If you start taking Cerazette between days one to five of your period, you should have a good level of protection fairly quickly. However, if you start taking it after day five, then you will not be protected, and you will need to wait 48 hours for it to work.

    Our advice is to give it a few weeks before engaging in unprotected intercourse.

  • Side Effects

    Cerazette Side Effects

    As with all contraceptive pills and medications in general, there is the possibility that patients might experience side effects.

    Below are some of the most common side effects that you might experience when taking the Cerazette pill:

    • Headaches
    • Acne
    • Nausea
    • Mood swings
    • Breast sensitivity
    • Irregular bleeding

    If you are concerned about any potential side effects experienced, speak to your doctor or pharmacist.

    How to Stop Bleeding on Cerazette

    It is common for most women to bleed on Cerazette for the first few months as your body is adjusting to it. However, there are some cases where irregular bleeding persists. If this is the case, speak to your doctor or pharmacist who will be able to advise as to a course of action.

  • Patient Information Leaflet

    Cerazette Pill Patient Information Leaflet

    For more information on the Cerazette contraceptive pill, take a look at the patient information leaflet below:

  • FAQ

    • Are All Daily Oral Contraceptives The Same?

      No, not all oral contaceptives are the same. There are many different types of oral contraception and each one differs slightly. Your oral contraception should be taken as directed by your prescriber. If you miss doses and do not take your pill as it has been prescribed it will not be as effective and may not work. 

    • What Types of 'The Pill' Are Available?

      There are two main types of oral contraception: The combined pill (CoC), which containes two hormones, progestin and oestrogen and the progesterone only pill (PoP), often referred to as the mini pill, contains only one hormone, progesterone. Both types of oral contraception the CoC and PoP are 99% effective if taken as prescribed meaning your chances of becoming pregnant if you have unprotected sex are very low. Although you are unlikley to become pregnant, you are still likely to contract a sexually transmitted infection if you are regularly having unprotected sex with different partners. 

    • What is "The Pill"?

      Contraceptive pills are often referred to as "The Pill". Contraceptive pills consist of synthetic hormones (hormones that mimic the ones made in your body). They are composed of a synthetic type of oestrogen and progesterone. The Combined Oral Contraceptive (CoC) containes both of these hormones and the Progeterone Only Pill (PoP) (The Mini-Pill) only contains one of these hormones (progestin).

    • If I Vomit or Have Diarrhoea After Taking The Pill, What Do I Do?

      If you have severe diarrhoea or vomit 3-4 hours after taking your pill, the chances of you being protected from getting pregnant are less likely. If this does happen to you, you should take another pill within 12 hours of your episode. If you are taking the inactive pill when this happens then you do not have to take another pill to compensate.

    • How Reliable is Oral Contraception?

      If your dose is taken as prescribed and then the pill is one of the most reliable forms of contraception when it comes to protecting you against pregnancy. The pill is 99% effective at preventing pregnancies if taken appropriately, however it does not protect against STI's meaning if you are having sex with different partners, barrier contraception should still be used.

    • How Hard is it to Remember to Take Oral Contraception?

      If you manage to adopt a regular routine of taking your pill as soon as you get up, you are less likely to forget. If you do find that you are more likely to forget then it is best to set reminders on your phone. Alternatively there are many apps avaialbe for android and iOS such as myPill that can help you to remember to take your pill. 

    • Do I Have to Take My Pill at The Same Time Everyday?

      Routine is imperative when you start taking oral contraception. The time of day you take the pill does not matter, however if you should pick to take it in the morning, afternoon or night time- whatever time you decide to choose you must be consistent with it and continue to take it during this period of time every day. 

    • Can I Still Have Sex During The 4 or 7-Day Break?

      It is safe to have sex during the the break if you have been taking your pill properly as prescribed. If you are having regular unprotected sex during this time you should be vigilant to start your next pack or strip on time and to make sure you are taking your pill properly. 

    • I Have Not Had My Period And I Have Been Taking My Pill as Prescribed, am I Pregnant?

      It is important to understand that if you have been taking your pill on time everyday as directed by your prescriber then the chances of you being pregnant are extremely low. If you are not getting your period whilst taking the pill then there is a chance that the lining of the womb has not formed enough for it to be released, if you continue to not see any bleeding or have a period for 2 months or more than you should contact your prescriber for investigation.